Take action in your day-to-day life

We can all reduce our personal contribution to the climate crisis and set an example for others by changing some of our daily habits. Below are some actions that will help. Not every action is possible for every person, but each step you take can make a difference.

 

Reduce emissions to curb pollution
Choose a fuel-efficient car or other forms of transportation that use less (or no) fossil fuel per person. Take a train, subway, or bus; carpool; walk; or bike.

Buy efficient appliances that use less electricity
Look for the Energy Star awarded by the EPA when you purchase your next dishwasher or toaster.

Reduce everyday electrical use
Develop a plan to reduce daily electricity use around your home. Ask each member of your household to take responsibility for a different electricity-saving action; turn the lights off when you leave the room, unplug appliances when they are not in use. Use compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) or LED lighting, and only run dishwashers and washing machines with full loads.

Turn off electronic devices 
Turn off your television, stereo, computer, fans, and lights when they’re not in use and you will save thousands of pounds of carbon dioxide emissions a year.

Insulate your home
Take simple measures. By insulating lofts and draft-proofing doors and windows on a large scale, you can reduce your energy consumption each month and also create local jobs in your community.

Consumer solar and geothermal
Federal tax credits allow you to deduct up to 26% of the costs on your tax return and states are also offering incentives to make consumer clean energy a reality. You can save money and reduce your carbon footprint, while making a real investment in job creation.

Switch to efficient lighting
Replace incandescent bulbs with CFLs or LED lighting. These bulbs use four times less energy and they last eight times longer. You will cut your electricity bills dramatically and save money by not buying as many lightbulbs.

Use an energy efficient computer
Buy a laptop instead of a desktop. Laptops consume five times less electricity. If you buy a desktop, make sure to get a LCD screen. Enable the power management function on your computer; the screensaver does not save energy. Check if your computer supports the more advanced Speedstep power management. Switch off a computer when you’re not using it, which also helps extend its lifetime. Minimize printing and print on both sides of the paper. And remember: Laser printers use more electricity than inkjet printers.

Check your tires
Keeping your tires inflated properly improves the fuel efficiency of your car. Every gallon of gasoline that you save keeps 5.5 pounds of carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. Radial tires will help you save 3 to 7% of fuel.

Use water carefully
Don’t waste water. Use a cup of water when brushing your teeth or shaving.

Recycle that plastic bag
Reuse your plastic bag or take a cloth bag with you when you shop. Avoid products with a lot of packaging. Make a decision to pick non-plastic toys for your children and their friend’s birthday presents. And think twice about how you grocery shop and how your food is packaged.

Move your air-conditioning thermostat up two degrees
You can save about 2,000 pounds of carbon dioxide a year with this simple adjustment.

Plant more trees
Planting a single tree will absorb one ton of carbon dioxide over its lifetime.

Reuse & recycle
Recycle and reuse products like paper and bottles and you will help protect the environment and create jobs. Use recycled paper. Recycle your office and household waste.

Shop differently: Buy local
Everything we buy has a carbon footprint, either because of the way it was produced or in how it is transported. For instance, the clothing industry represents around 10% of the world’s carbon emissions mostly because of the use of energy to produce attire, and this is exacerbated by ‘fast fashion‘ preferences that cause clothing to be discarded or fall apart after short periods. International transport, including maritime and air shipping, also has an impact. Groceries shipped from Chile and Australia to Europe, or the other way around, have more ‘food miles’ and usually a higher footprint than local produce. But this is not always the case, as some countries grow out-of-season crops in energy-intensive greenhouses — so the best approach is to eat food that is both locally grown and seasonal.

 

Social scientists say these acts of influence occur because we constantly evaluate what our peers do around us and we adjust our beliefs and actions accordingly. When people see their neighbors taking environmental action, like conserving energy, they infer that people like them also value sustainability and feel more compelled to act.

But what if I just can’t avoid that flight, or cut down on driving?
If you can’t make every change recommended, consider offsetting your emissions with a trusted green project — not a ‘get out of jail free card’, but another resource in your toolbox to compensate for that unavoidable flight or car trip. The UN Convention on Climate Change keeps a portfolio of dozens of projects around the world you can contribute to. To find out how many emissions you would want to ‘buy’ back, you can use the UN’s carbon footprint calculator. Whether you are a coffee farmer in Colombia, a homeowner in California, or a farmer in Iowa — climate change will have a direct impact on your life. But the opposite is also true: your actions will influence the planet for the coming decades — for better and for worse.

 

A partner with the American Security Project | Privacy Policy | © 2020 World War Zero 

Take action in your day-to-day life

We can all reduce our personal contribution to the climate crisis and set an example for others by changing some of our daily habits. Below are some actions that will help. Not every action is possible for every person, but each step you take can make a difference.

 

Reduce emissions to curb pollution
Choose a fuel-efficient car or other forms of transportation that use less (or no) fossil fuel per person. Take a train, subway, or bus; carpool; walk; or bike.

Buy efficient appliances that use less electricity
Look for the Energy Star awarded by the EPA when you purchase your next dishwasher or toaster.

Reduce everyday electrical use
Develop a plan to reduce daily electricity use around your home. Ask each member of your household to take responsibility for a different electricity-saving action; turn the lights off when you leave the room, unplug appliances when they are not in use. Use compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) or LED lighting, and only run dishwashers and washing machines with full loads.

Turn off electronic devices 
Turn off your television, stereo, computer, fans, and lights when they’re not in use and you will save thousands of pounds of carbon dioxide emissions a year.

Insulate your home
Take simple measures. By insulating lofts and draft-proofing doors and windows on a large scale, you can reduce your energy consumption each month and also create local jobs in your community.

Consumer solar and geothermal
Federal tax credits allow you to deduct up to 26% of the costs on your tax return and states are also offering incentives to make consumer clean energy a reality. You can save money and reduce your carbon footprint, while making a real investment in job creation.

Switch to efficient lighting
Replace incandescent bulbs with CFLs or LED lighting. These bulbs use four times less energy and they last eight times longer. You will cut your electricity bills dramatically and save money by not buying as many lightbulbs.

Use an energy efficient computer
Buy a laptop instead of a desktop. Laptops consume five times less electricity. If you buy a desktop, make sure to get a LCD screen. Enable the power management function on your computer; the screensaver does not save energy. Check if your computer supports the more advanced Speedstep power management. Switch off a computer when you’re not using it, which also helps extend its lifetime. Minimize printing and print on both sides of the paper. And remember: Laser printers use more electricity than inkjet printers.

Check your tires
Keeping your tires inflated properly improves the fuel efficiency of your car. Every gallon of gasoline that you save keeps 5.5 pounds of carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. Radial tires will help you save 3 to 7% of fuel.

Use water carefully
Don’t waste water. Use a cup of water when brushing your teeth or shaving.

Recycle that plastic bag
Reuse your plastic bag or take a cloth bag with you when you shop. Avoid products with a lot of packaging. Make a decision to pick non-plastic toys for your children and their friend’s birthday presents. And think twice about how you grocery shop and how your food is packaged.

Move your air-conditioning thermostat up two degrees
You can save about 2,000 pounds of carbon dioxide a year with this simple adjustment.

Plant more trees
Planting a single tree will absorb one ton of carbon dioxide over its lifetime.

Reuse & recycle
Recycle and reuse products like paper and bottles and you will help protect the environment and create jobs. Use recycled paper. Recycle your office and household waste.

Shop differently: Buy local
Everything we buy has a carbon footprint, either because of the way it was produced or in how it is transported. For instance, the clothing industry represents around 10% of the world’s carbon emissions mostly because of the use of energy to produce attire, and this is exacerbated by ‘fast fashion‘ preferences that cause clothing to be discarded or fall apart after short periods. International transport, including maritime and air shipping, also has an impact. Groceries shipped from Chile and Australia to Europe, or the other way around, have more ‘food miles’ and usually a higher footprint than local produce. But this is not always the case, as some countries grow out-of-season crops in energy-intensive greenhouses — so the best approach is to eat food that is both locally grown and seasonal.

 

Social scientists say these acts of influence occur because we constantly evaluate what our peers do around us and we adjust our beliefs and actions accordingly. When people see their neighbors taking environmental action, like conserving energy, they infer that people like them also value sustainability and feel more compelled to act.

But what if I just can’t avoid that flight, or cut down on driving?
If you can’t make every change recommended, consider offsetting your emissions with a trusted green project — not a ‘get out of jail free card’, but another resource in your toolbox to compensate for that unavoidable flight or car trip. The UN Convention on Climate Change keeps a portfolio of dozens of projects around the world you can contribute to. To find out how many emissions you would want to ‘buy’ back, you can use the UN’s carbon footprint calculator. Whether you are a coffee farmer in Colombia, a homeowner in California, or a farmer in Iowa — climate change will have a direct impact on your life. But the opposite is also true: your actions will influence the planet for the coming decades — for better and for worse.

 

Privacy Policy | © 2020 World War Zero